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The Boatless Angler - Chapter 5.2 - Shore Pan Fishing with Live Bait 2

Live bait, is live bait, is live bait! It always works for panfish….Wrong! As mentioned in part 1 of this shore pan fishing chapter, you need the right rig to catch those big pans with live bait. However, in addition to the rig, you have to be able to…

Chapter 5: Shore Pan Fishing with Live Bait
Part 2 – Rigging Live Bait for Pan’s

Live bait, is live bait, is live bait! It always works for panfish….Wrong!

As mentioned in part 1 of this shore pan fishing chapter, you need the right rig to catch those big pans with live bait. However, in addition to the rig, you have to be able to present the bait in the correct manner, which is of course how you put it on the hook.

The two most common types of live bait for panfish are minnows and worms. Both these baits can be placed on the hook in many variations, but there are a few key ways that not only allow your bait to stay alive longer, but also allow you to catch more fish!

Worm rigging

Worms are in fact the most common bait used in freshwater and are also most commonly rigged incorrectly when targeting panfish. The key to rigging up a worm is to hide as most of the hook as possible as well as keeping a worm’s natural form intact.

This means you don’t bunch it up on the hook into a ball, but rather you thread the worm on the hook. To thread a worm onto a hook you want to begin with the head first so the head ends up at the top of the hook and its tail is at the bottom portion. So begin by threading the head all the way up the shank of the hook and over the eye.

Threading your worm over the eye of the hook not only hides it but it helps keep your worm streamline and prevents the worm from sliding down as well. Once the head of the worm is over the eye you want to stop threading keeping the tail end of the worm hanging off the hook. This free tail-end provides phenomenal action which will attract those monster panfish.

Minnow Rigging

There are 2 very effective ways to rig a minnow for panfish, the first one shown here is the most productive way as it provides the best action and at the same time keeps the minnow alive for a long period of time. It is truly the pan fish magnet! First you want to take your hook and place it through one of the nostrils and have it exit the mouth of the minnow.

To know if you have placed it properly in the nostril, you will feel a bit of resistance when placing the hook in this manner. If you do not feel the resistance and it seems like the minnow is going to fall off right away, try to place the hook as far on the inside of the nostril as possible. Keep in mind that this minnow rigging method is best when making short casts; otherwise it will in fact fall off if you’re not careful. But with a bit of practice and finesse, you’ll make this your favorite minnow rig!

The second method to hooking a minnow for panfish is very similar to the first but this rig you are going to use when you have to make further casts, or when your minnows are very small and happen not to stay on the hook. This time you’re going to place the hook it through the nostril again, but have the hook exit at the chin. This creates the same action as the first minnow rig but it does not allow the minnow to live as long. Although this is true, this rig will keep your minnow firmly on the hook.

One of the most important aspects of these two minnow rigging methods is that the minnows are rigged at the head. Panfish, whether it’s perch, crappie or sunfish all eat minnows head first, and when they do strike, your hook will be right there for a fast and effective hook set!

Summary

So keep in mind when you go panfishing, make sure you rig is right, and that your live bait you are using is put on the hook properly. These tips on panfishing will catch those huge panfish and will help you fill your bucket in no time!

Antonio.




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